Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 251 results.
Barbara Dennison, MD •
Health Research Inc./New York State Department of Health

Formula supplementation of breastfed infants varies across hospitals. Hospital breastfeeding policies and supplementation practices contribute to this variation. Improving hospital practices could lead to improved breastfeeding outcomes.

 
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW •
University of Washington, Office of Sponsored Programs

This study describes patient characteristics, clinical features, and EMS response to opioid overdoses in Seattle, comparing heroin and pharmaceutical opioid (PO) overdoses from six alternating months in 2011. While they are clinical similar, the study finds that heroin and pharmaceutical opioid overdoses are treated differently by responders.

 
Jennifer Ibrahim, PhD, MPH, MA •
Temple University
Aaron Sorenson, MS •
UberResearch
Heidi Grunwald, PhD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Using data from the UberResearch NIH grant repository, researchers from the Center for Public Health Law Research and UberResearch in Cambridge, Mass., collected and coded all National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants with a focus on health policy between FY’85 and FY’14 and then analyzed the grants by funding agency and topic areas. The study finds that NIH has supported public health law research, but not to the extent necessary to timely evaluate laws affecting the public’s health.

 
Benjamin Mason Meier, JD, LLM, PhD •
University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
Lindsay Cloud, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Nicolas Wilhelm, JD •
Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This study analyzes the scope and content of existing national legislation in each of the Global Health Securite Agenda Action Packages.

 
Marizen Ramirez, PhD, MPH •
University of Minnesota

From 2013 to 2014, researchers conducted 47 semi-structured interviews with school and district administrators in Iowa about its 2007 anti-bullying law. Administrators identified many policy implementation challenges related to funding and staff, prevention programs, applying the law’s bullying definition in investigations, and understanding the school’s jurisdiction for policy enforcement. They also raised contextual barriers to implementation, like media portrayals of bullying and parental attitudes.

 
Laura Hitchcock, JD •
Seattle-King County Department of Public Health
Julia Dilley, PhD, MES •
Multnomah County Health Department (Oregon)

This legal map includes more than 100 components of city and county ordinances in Washington that govern the zoning and siting for businesses that produce, process and sell recreational and medical marijuana, as well as regulations governing individual access to the products.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Four longitudinal, empirical legal maps on LawAtlas.org that explore state-level HIA and HiAP bills and laws that were introduced, enacted and/or amended between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2016.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The authors describe Five Essential Public Health Law Services and suggest investment in the people, methods and tools needed to move major policy initiatives from conception to widespread implementation. The model reflects a transdisciplinary approach integrating public health legal practice with law-related surveillance, evaluation and enforcement functions usually performed by public health practitioners. As an elaboration of law-related activities within the Ten Essential Public Health Services, the framework can be used to define, evaluate and strengthen public health law functions.

 
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Each week, the team from the Policies for Action Research Hub posts a summary of the latest news in housing equity and law. Visit the Harvard Petrie-Flom Center's Bill of Health Law to see all the weekly reviews.

 
Marie-Claude Lavoie •
University of Maryland at Baltimore

Researchers from the University of Maryland Baltimore found that the alcohol sales tax increase resulted in a 6 percent annual reduction in the rate of alcohol-positive drivers involved in an injury crash with an even more pronounced effect among younger drivers.

The alcohol sales tax impacted drivers 15 to 20 years old and 21 to 34 years old more than the older age groups. Among young drivers, there was a 12 percent annual reduction following the alcohol sales tax increase.

 

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