Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 21 results.
Jennifer Ibrahim, PhD, MPH, MA •
Temple University
Aaron Sorenson, MS •
UberResearch
Heidi Grunwald, PhD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Using data from the UberResearch NIH grant repository, researchers from the Center for Public Health Law Research and UberResearch in Cambridge, Mass., collected and coded all National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants with a focus on health policy between FY’85 and FY’14 and then analyzed the grants by funding agency and topic areas. The study finds that NIH has supported public health law research, but not to the extent necessary to timely evaluate laws affecting the public’s health.

 
Benjamin Mason Meier, JD, LLM, PhD •
University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill
Lindsay Cloud, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Nicolas Wilhelm, JD •
Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This study analyzes the scope and content of existing national legislation in each of the Global Health Securite Agenda Action Packages.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Four longitudinal, empirical legal maps on LawAtlas.org that explore state-level HIA and HiAP bills and laws that were introduced, enacted and/or amended between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2016.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The authors describe Five Essential Public Health Law Services and suggest investment in the people, methods and tools needed to move major policy initiatives from conception to widespread implementation. The model reflects a transdisciplinary approach integrating public health legal practice with law-related surveillance, evaluation and enforcement functions usually performed by public health practitioners. As an elaboration of law-related activities within the Ten Essential Public Health Services, the framework can be used to define, evaluate and strengthen public health law functions.

 
Tony Kuo, MD, MSHS •
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

This study examined the extent of public awareness and use of school-based physical activity resources in Los Angeles County. Findings suggest that while a large percentage (57.7%) of people have access to school-based physical activity resources, only a portion (30.3%) use them.

 
Tony Kuo, MD, MSHS •
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

A team from the LA Department of Health analyzed 20 different documents broadly defined as “joint use agreements.” The findings are displayed in this report, which provides a snapshot of the relative strengths and weaknesses of all 20 agreements through analysis and case studies from neighborhoods in the Los Angeles area.

 
Susan Mangold, JD •
Juvenile Law Center
Catherine Cerulli, JD, PhD •
University of Rochester
Crystal Ward Allen, MSW •
Research Foundation of State University of New York on behalf of University at Buffalo

The study examined whether the source (federal/state/local) or type (restricted/flexible) of funding impacts quality outcome measures linked to mental health of children in foster care. The researchers find that flexible funding is linked to reduced median days in care and days awaiting adoption.

 
Tony Kuo, MD, MSHS •
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

This study concludes that shared-use agreements that include legal clauses to address school concerns about factors such as vandalism, staffing and funding represent a promising strategy for increasing physical activity opportunities in under-resourced neighborhoods where the prevalence of obesity is high.

 
Carol Cannon, MA •
CDM Group
Sue Thomas, PhD •
HBSA Inc.

Zoning laws that mix residential units with commercial and public/civic destinations have the potential to increase walkability. This study finds that significant relationships exist between the range and precision with which the zoning ordinances have been written and the mixture of walking destinations that result within the areas.

 

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