Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 52 results.
Leo Beletsky, JD, MPH •
Health in Justice Action Lab
Sarah Seymour •
Health in Justice Action Lab

This legal map presents statutes and regulations that authorize the involuntary commitment of substance users, in effect as of March 1, 2018. It catalogs the statutory standards authorizing commitment, parties authorized to petition for a commitment, provisions surrounding clinical assessments, parameters of judicial review, time periods for commitment authorization, allowable treatment, and procedures for recommitment.

 
Sarah B. Klieger, MPH •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Leslie Allen, JD •
Women Against Abuse, Inc.
Rosalie Pacula, PhD •
RAND
Jennifer Ibrahim, PhD, MPH, MA •
Temple University
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

As of February 1, 2017 state laws disparately regulate patient registration and civil rights, product safety labeling and packaging, and dispensaries, creating a patchwork of regulatory strategies whose effectiveness remains unknown.

 
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW •
University of Washington, Office of Sponsored Programs

This study describes patient characteristics, clinical features, and EMS response to opioid overdoses in Seattle, comparing heroin and pharmaceutical opioid (PO) overdoses from six alternating months in 2011. While they are clinical similar, the study finds that heroin and pharmaceutical opioid overdoses are treated differently by responders.

 
Laura Hitchcock, JD •
Seattle-King County Department of Public Health
Julia Dilley, PhD, MES •
Multnomah County Health Department (Oregon)

This legal map includes more than 100 components of city and county ordinances in Washington that govern the zoning and siting for businesses that produce, process and sell recreational and medical marijuana, as well as regulations governing individual access to the products.

 
Marie-Claude Lavoie •
University of Maryland at Baltimore

Researchers from the University of Maryland Baltimore found that the alcohol sales tax increase resulted in a 6 percent annual reduction in the rate of alcohol-positive drivers involved in an injury crash with an even more pronounced effect among younger drivers.

The alcohol sales tax impacted drivers 15 to 20 years old and 21 to 34 years old more than the older age groups. Among young drivers, there was a 12 percent annual reduction following the alcohol sales tax increase.

 

Pages