Evidence Library

Showing 9 of 29 results.
Carla Campbell, MD, MS •
Drexel University
Curtis Cummings, MD, MPH •
Drexel University
The Philadelphia Lead Court (PLC) was created as an innovative law enforcement strategy to compel property owners to comply with city health codes to remediate their properties of lead hazards, which had led to elevated blood lead levels and lead poisoning in resident children. This study presents a detailed account of and analyzes the opinions of fifteen key informants drawn from the Philadelphia health and law departments and judicial system that staff and run the PLC in response to a fifteen-question structured survey.
 
Katrina Korfmacher, MS, PhD •
University of Rochester Medical Center

This article evaluated the effectiveness of a comprehensive rental housing–based lead law adopted in Rochester, New York, in 2005 by integrating analyses of city inspections data, a survey of landlords, landlord focus groups, and health department data on children’s blood lead levels from the first 4 years of implementation of the 2005 law. Although many uncertainties remain, this study's analysis suggests that the lead law has had a positive impact on children’s health.

 
Katrina Korfmacher, MS, PhD •
University of Rochester Medical Center
Michael Hanley, JD •
University of Rochester Medical Center

Although lead paint was banned by federal law in 1978, it continues to poison children living in homes built before that time. Federal and state laws have reduced rates of lead poisoning significantly in the past three decades. However, pockets of high rates of lead poisoning remain, primarily in low-income urban neighborhoods with older housing stock. Recently, several municipalities have passed local lead laws to reduce lead hazards in high-risk areas. This analysis suggests that local laws hold great promise for reducing lead hazards in children's homes.

 
James Anderson, JD •
RAND Corporation

In this Critical Opportunities presentation, James Anderson, JD, from RAND Corporation, explains how city blocks that have some land parcels zoned for residential use experience substantially less crime than blocks that are zoned only for commercial or industrial uses. He suggests encouraging residential zoning in commercial areas as a way to reduce crime.

 

This set of six LawAtlas maps outline the current state of statutes and regulations governing oil and gas drilling and development activities as they relate to water quality and water quantity. The maps cover the use of water and five stages of development: permitting, design & construction; well drilling; well completion; production and operation; and reclamation.

 

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